iPository

| 1 Comment

iPad it is, huh? Let's get the good out of the way first: very nice screen, beautifully designed case (The bezel's a little big; but, I'll get to that.), impressive that it syncs with cameras (with a dongle), handles 3G (for $130 extra), and is, for Apple, reasonably priced.

Problems:

  • The name!! Come on people?! What're they going to call v2, iPad 2, Heavy Flow
  • No camera front or back, probably front facing first, then wrap-around coverage in v3: Light Days.
  • No multitasking for third party apps. Contrary to what's said, the iPhone OS does multitask, it just doesn't allow things like Skype to keep running in the background. I can see where developers could beat the OS to death and tie-up the built-in functions; but, those apps that screw up would be ridiculed out of contention.
  • Adobe and Apple need to kiss and make up. No flash?! Don't get me wrong, I don't really like Flash much anymore, mostly because of the item above; but, though it's easy to hate in many respects, it has stood the test of time and enough people use it for their ads that Apple should be concerned about losing revenue.
  • Speaking of revenue, funny how iBookstore looks almost identical to Delicious Library, I do hope those devs got paid. Also, what about annotations, searching a book, extending the functionality?! Oh, right, you can't because you don't get to have access to the file system.
  • Speaking of restricted access, Apple has decided that users don’t deserve a first class file system.
  • No shell

I’ve heard many interviews of this guy, Jonathan Zittrain, on NPR and elsewhere decrying the world of closed tech. At first I was full-blown fan-boy mad at him; now, I'm just a little ambivalent. On the one hand, it's true that the internet did allow, and mostly, still does allow, open anyone who wants to understand it to read the source code and dive in. There are plenty of examples of how and why this is bad. I won't get into them as I must go put on my ballet hat.

If you’re in the market for an eBook reader, the iPad is for you; as you'll be able to do much much more than any of the competing devices, it will be gorgeous, and probably even fun. The name, however, must go.

1 Comment



Scientists say the combination of higher temperatures and single crops over extended periods increases problems with pests. Erick Fernandes, an adviser on climate change at the World Bank in Washington, says pests and the growing use of insecticides are not good for the land or for water sources. "Local observation suggests that as part of the extreme events, pest and invasive species are increasing,doudoune moncler,网传女子在地铁车厢内当众更衣(图) Flowers and soil destined can not be separated , even a quarter of an hour . [br /] We are all students living on campus every day to see her go home on weekends , though not meet, but we learned first-line acoustic telephone as our way of communicating . Even gentle greeting , but also to each other the best comfort," he said.?

At the International Center for Tropical Agriculture, or CIAT, in Cali,28 -year-old investment bank, died of stomach canc Flowers and soil destined can not be separated , even a quarter of an hour . [br /] We are all students living on campus every day to see her go home on weekends , though not meet, but we learned first-line acoustic telephone as our way of communicating . Even gentle greeting , but also to each other the best comfort, scientist Andy Jarvis is in charge of the climate change and policy program. He says at CIAT,ralph lauren pas cher, scientists are working on crop improvement,ralph lauren, mostly through genetic modifications "For example, beans are quite sensitive to heat and drought and so we have been looking at different scenarios of the types of genes that we can be putting into those crops so they can adapt to the future challenges."

But Erick Fernandes at the World Bank says not everybody likes geneticaly modified crops,franklin marshall, and other options must be considered. "Just by management alone you can probably increase your adapted capacity of that crop, several fold," he said.

Fernandes says creating shaded areas, crop rotation and maintaining the environmental balance could greatly mitigate the effects of climate change.

Both Fernandes and Jarvis say increasing population represents the most serious challenge. "The real issue is not if we can produce more food but we have to produce 50 to 70% more food to address global population increase." Jarvis said.

And both say more needs to be done. "I think agriculture needs to assume a much higher profile in the discussions related to climate change. Just tackling forest or just tackling global warming is not going to do it unless we bring together the agricultural dimensions into that," Fernandes said.

"Every year that we don't address the issue,内丘县二手手机出售 Flowers and soil destined can not be separated , even a quarter of an hour . [br /] We are all students living on campus every day to see her go home on weekends , though not meet, but we learned first-line acoustic telephone as our way of communicating . Even gentle greeting , but also to each other the best comfort, the issue is getting bigger and more costly to address later," Jarvis said.

The International Center for Tropical Agriculture also is conducting research in Africa and Asia and has begun a large multi-million dollar program to adapt global agriculture to climate change.


Download Audio

Scientists around the world predict that climate change will have dramatic effects on agriculture in the coming decades. So,casque beats, too,louboutin pas cher, will pests and pesticides, the loss of species and the need to increase food production for a growing population. Researchers at the International Agricultural Research Institute in Colombia are among those searching for solutions.

Nearby farmer Zoraida Mosquera agrees. She says hotter temperatures damage many harvests, including coffee. "At the cooperative,louboutin, they buy it as the lowest quality."

Not far away, farmer Elias Claros Paz says higher temperatures are not the only problem. "We used to plant tomatoes, but we stopped because of pests. In order to get a harvest we had to spray seven and eight times with the most toxic chemicals."

Producer Zulima Palacio recently visited the institute, and also spoke to Colombian farmers. This is her second of two reports from the South American nation.

In the tropical mountains in Colombia,polo ralph laurenzh, long-time coffee grower Nelson Moreno recently started planting cassava, because he says he needed to use expensive chemicals to get a decent harvest of coffee. "The weather has changed too much. It is hard to live with this heat," Moreno said.

Leave a comment

About this Entry

This page contains a single entry by Benjie published on January 27, 2010 4:07 PM.

An evening of bad parenting... was the previous entry in this blog.

MT 5 is the next entry in this blog.

Find recent content on the main index or look in the archives to find all content.